5Nov

Digital to Overtake TV Ad Spending in Two Years, Says Forrester

Digital to Overtake TV Ad Spending in Two Years, Says Forrester
// Advertising Age – Digital


U.S. advertisers’ spending on digital advertising will overtake TV in 2016 and hit $103 billion in 2019 to represent 36% of all ad spending, according to Forrester’s latest estimates based on its ForecastView model. U.S. advertisers will spend $85.8 billion on TV ads in 2019, which will equal 30% of overall ad spending that year, according to Forrester.

But digital won’t usurp TV because of big brand advertisers taking their commercial money and redirecting it toward YouTube and Facebook. There will be some cannibalization of TV budgets, but the bigger contributing factor will be an influx of new money dedicated to digital because marketers are able to prove that digital works, said Forrester analyst Shar VanBoskirk.

Marketers aren’t upping their digital budgets because of bright shiny objects like so-called native ads or computer-automated programmatic buying processes. They’re doing so because the economy has recovered. Advertisers have more money to spend now than in recent years and the oversupply of ad inventory online gives them a lot of places to put that money. And they’re comfortable spending their money online because years of testing and learning has shown those digital dollars are well spent.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

5Nov

Channel 4 puts interactive ads on mobile

Channel 4 puts interactive ads on mobile

Channel 4Channel 4 has become the first broadcaster to launch interactive video as formats, known as iVOD, on iOS mobiles and tablets.

Agencies and advertisers who choose Ad Link, Ad Extend, Ad Bloom and Ad Shop will see their digital TV campaigns additionally supported on mobile devices, at no extra cost.

30Oct

Netflix’s Fun Outdoor Ads Use 100 Awesome GIFs From Shows and Movies

Netflix’s Fun Outdoor Ads Use 100 Awesome GIFs From Shows and Movies
// Adweek.com – Top News

GIFs have left the nest!

The digital video files first made a jump to TV a while back, thanks to Fiat. And now they’ve ventured all the way outside in a fascinating Netflix campaign from Ogilvy Paris.

For the streaming service’s launch in France, the agency created 100 different GIFs, some of which “reacted” to current events and even things like the weather (for example, a rainy scene from a film when it’s actually raining at a bus stop).

People who hate GIFs will surely be appalled at this. And yes, it’s a little jarring to see the hypnotic looping videos running on large formats outside. But they’re undeniably eye-catching in ways that other digital video just isn’t.

Check out the case study below.

28Oct

HTML5 is now final and ready for prime time, says the World Wide Web Consortium

HTML5 is now final and ready for prime time, says the World Wide Web Consortium
// The Next Web » Insider

The HTML5 standard is now officially being recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The HTML5 standard has been around for years and powers many of your favorite sites. Today’s news from W3C (the international standards organization for the World Wide Web) says that after all those years of use, HTML5 is ready for prime time. HTML5 allows for native media playing in browsers. Previously, technologies like QuickTime and Flash were needed to play videos in a site’s page. The organization says that it worked with more than 60 companies getting the standard finalized and that over 4,000 bugs were…

This story continues at The Next Web

28Oct

Would You Pay for an Ad-free YouTube?

Would You Pay for an Ad-free YouTube?
// SocialTimes.com

ad-free youtube

YouTube is exploring the option of a paid subscription model. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki talked about the idea at Recode’s Code/Mobile conference on Monday. “We’re thinking about how to give users options,” she said, referencing apps that give users the option to pay up or view ads.

“We’re early in that process, but if you look at media over time, most of them have both ads and subscription services,” she said.

Wojcicki, who joined YouTube in February, was instrumental in building up Google’s ad business.

Giving users more choice would be a smart move for the platform. According to Wojcicki, the site is growing 50 percent every year. That kind of growth is attracting traditional media’s millions.

However, Wojcicki did not offer details about this model, so it’s unclear how creators would benefit from it. While content creators generate the value for the network, they don’t get much in return.

YouTube most popular creator, PewDiePie, has more than 31 million subscribers and makes millions from advertising. But he’s critical of how the platform treats the little guys: “All the money disappears… Google takes 45 percent of their ads, then the network takes 50 percent of theirs, that doesn’t leave that much money in the end. And it’s still the YouTuber who has produced, financed and made all the material on his or her own.”

Whether or not content creators would benefit from this type of subscription model remains to be seen. But for people who watch a lot of YouTube videos, it might be worth it to pay up and avoid the annoyance of pre-roll ads.

Readers: Would you pay for an ad-free YouTube?

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